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AI For Your Customers: Crafting Policies That Build Trust

When you’re crafting your AI policy, go beyond your internal needs and consider your customers as well. Many customers care about how you’re using AI to deliver their products and services – especially if you’re capturing data about them and tailoring their experience based on that data. Respect their expectations and values, and make sure you’re clear about how AI shapes their experiences.

How do your customers feel about the way you’re using AI in your organisation?

As a leader, you might be contemplating a policy, framework, or guidelines for AI use. Go beyond the internal focus – how we use it internally in our teams and organisation – to consider the external customer viewpoint, too.

Customers and clients care about how you’re using AI – especially if you’re capturing data about them and tailoring their experience based on that data. Respect their expectations and values, and make sure you’re clear about how AI shapes their experiences.

For examples, if you’re a customer of Woolworths or Coles, you might have a Woolies Rewards card or a Coles Fly Buys card, earning points and rewards and receiving customised offers. You’re probably aware that behind the scenes, there’s some sophisticated AI working on your data to persuade you to buy more and provide more targeted offers. This means getting relevant marketing rather than being flooded with irrelevant offers.

How do you feel about that? Some customers are cautious and concerned: They wonder about data collection, storage, security procedures, and how their data is being “used against them”. On the flip side, many are positive about it: They appreciate the sophisticated algorithms ensuring they receive targeted advertising, saving them from a barrage of irrelevant marketing.

Here’s another example – the education sector. I’ve worked with school leaders to consider what they need to think about from a leadership and governance perspective when using AI. Parents care about the school’s AI policy, how it’s used effectively, and how it keeps their children safe from AI’s dangers. Some schools focus on AI’s positive side, using it to position themselves as the go-to for parents who want their children prepared for an AI-enabled future.

These examples from very different sectors might resonate with you. Think about how your customers, clients, patients, parents, and other stakeholders think about the way you use AI. That should influence your policy and guidelines.

If you’re interested in diving deeper into this, register for my free public online presentation coming up soon. It’s for leaders at all levels to help you understand how to craft your framework for AI use in your organisation.

REGISTER FOR THE VIRTUAL MASTERCLASS

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